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1 edition of High-level radioactive waste found in the catalog.

High-level radioactive waste

High-level radioactive waste

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Published by National Conference of State Legislatures in Denver, Colo .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Radioactive waste disposal -- United States -- Directories.,
    • Radioactive wastes -- Directories.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementcompiled by Energy, Science and Natural Resources Program, National Conference of State Legislatures.
      ContributionsNational Conference of State Legislatures. Energy, Science, and Natural Resources Program.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTD898 .H544 1995
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiv, 27 p.:
      Number of Pages27
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL292265M
      LC Control Number97197264
      OCLC/WorldCa33093115

      As Congress outlined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (NWPA), as amended, the role of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is to serve as the independent regulator for the design, construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of a geologic repository for permanent disposal of high-level waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain. Fig. 1 — Toxicity of high-level radioactive waste versus time. 8 The ordinate is the number of cancer deaths that would be expected if all the waste prouced by one large nuclear power plan in one year were eaten by people. The individual curves show the toxicity of the individual radioactive species in the waste (as labeled), and the top black curve shows their sum, the total toxicity.

      The High-Level Radioactive Waste Committee is composed of nuclear waste transportation experts appointed by the Governors of eleven Western States. The Committee works with the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a safe and publicly acceptable system for transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste under the Nuclear Waste. From the time nuclear technology was first developed until , the search for a scientifically, technically, and politically acceptable system for managing high-level waste and spent reactor fuel was in a continued state of flux. 24 At present, many problems related to radioactive waste management remain unresolved.

      High-level waste is sufficiently radioactive for its decay heat (>2kW/m 3) to increase its temperature, and the temperature of its surroundings, significantly. As a result, high-level waste requires cooling and sufficient shielding. Most of the heat, at least after short-lived nuclides have decayed, is from the medium-lived fission products. High-level waste (HLW) is a type of nuclear waste created by the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It exists in two main forms: First and second cycle raffinate and other waste streams created by nuclear reprocessing. Waste formed by vitrification of liquid high-level waste. Liquid high-level waste is typically held temporarily in underground tanks pending vitrification.


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High-level radioactive waste Download PDF EPUB FB2

But the full title of the book dispels any notion of pop culture or my feeble attempt at being a smart-ass: 'Too Hot To Touch: The High-level radioactive waste book of High-Level Nuclear Waste'.

1) Well-written, well-organized, even-handed, and extremely well-documented/5(20). High Level Radioactive Waste Management: Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, May(Spanish) ISBN ISBN   Geologic Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste examines the fundamental knowledge and conditions to be considered and applied by planners and other professionals when establishing national repository concepts, and constructing repositories for the long-term isolation of highly radioactive waste from surrounding crystalline rock.

It emphasizes the important roles of Author: Roland Pusch, Raymond N Yong, Masashi Nakano. Book Description. Geologic Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste examines the fundamental knowledge and conditions to be considered and applied by planners and other professionals when establishing national repository concepts, and constructing repositories for the long-term isolation of highly radioactive waste from surrounding crystalline rock.

It emphasizes the important roles of. This collection contains papers on the technical and societal impacts of high-level radioactive waste presented at the Seventh Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held in Las Vegas, Nevada, April May 3, High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) Disposal: A Global Challenge presents the most recent information on proposed methods of disposal for the most dangerous radioactive waste and for assessing their function from short- and long-term discusses new aspects of the disposal of such waste, especially HLW.

The book is unique in the literature in making it clear that, due to. @article{osti_, title = {Radioactive waste disposal: low and high level}, author = {Gilmore, W R}, abstractNote = {The technology being developed to concentrate and immobilize both high-level and low-level radioactive wastes so that they may be disposed or stored in a comparatively safe and compact manner according to accepted U.S.

government nuclear guidelines is described. Most of the. This collection contains papers on current technical and social issues related to international high level radioactive waste management activities presented at the Sixth Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held in Las Vegas, Nevada, April May 5, In the United States, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act defined a process to develop a repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and defense high-level radioactive waste.

The United States Department of Energy was assigned responsibility for developing the repository in compliance with Environmental Protection Agency safety standards, and the. Description. This Safety Guide provides regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established for the predisposal management of high level waste.

This book will address concepts and techniques for preparation and disposal of low- (LLW) and intermediate-level (ILW) radioactive waste from the nuclear industry, the weapons industry, university Author: Roland Pusch.

High-level radioactive waste management concerns how radioactive materials created during production of nuclear power and nuclear weapons are dealt with. Radioactive waste contains a mixture of short-lived and long-lived nuclides, as well as non-radioactive nuclides.

A. Abdelouas, B. Grambow, in Radionuclide Behaviour in the Natural Environment, The effects of the near field in high-level radioactive waste disposal. For high-level waste (HLW) disposal the near field plays an important role in safety analysis and performance assessment because its main function is to prevent or delay the release of radionuclides to the geosphere.

To reduce the grave and unacceptable risks posed by the existing and continued production of high-level nuclear waste without a demonstrated means of final disposition, the Sierra Club supports federal assumption of responsibility for the long-term, least hazardous isolation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level wastes, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act ofthe.

The United States divides its radioactive waste into the following categories: high-level waste, transuranic waste, and low-level waste. High-level waste consists of spent irradiated nuclear fuel from commercial reactors and the liquid waste from solvent extraction cycles along with the solids that liquid wastes have been converted into from.

High-level radioactive waste is the waste that comes from producing nuclear materials for defense purposes. Ultimately, this waste is stored as sludge, liquid, or pellets, and must be solidified before manufacturers or labs can dispose of it.

Currently, the United States does not reprocess spent nuclear fuel, nor does it have a disposal facility for high-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive wastes are the highly radioactive materials produced as a byproduct of the reactions that occur inside nuclear reactors.

High-level wastes take one of two forms: Spent (used) reactor fuel when it is accepted for disposal; Waste materials remaining after spent fuel is reprocessed; Spent nuclear fuel is used fuel from a reactor that is no longer efficient in creating electricity, because.

Classification of Radioactive Waste IAEA Safety Standards, Radioactive Waste Management, Classification Scheme, Waste Classes, Low Level Waste, LLW, High Level Waste, HLW, Intermediate Level Waste, ILW, Exempt Waste, EW, Methods, Evaluation, Security Measures How to Access IAEA e-books.

Orders and requests for information may also be. Define high-level radioactive waste. high-level radioactive waste synonyms, high-level radioactive waste pronunciation, high-level radioactive waste translation, English dictionary definition of high-level radioactive waste.

high-level radioactive waste; High-Level Regulatory Cooperation Forum; High-Level Relational Describer; High-Level. Description of High Level Radioactive Waste Interpretation DOE may determine that waste is not “highly radioactive” and is therefore not HLW if the waste: (i) does not exceed concentration limits for Class C low-level radioactive waste as set out in section of title.

Full Description:" The Hanford Nuclear Reservation and Radioactive Pollution in the Columbia River Region reduces your potential stress.

The stress you have at work, your personal relationships, or many other problems you face in everyday life, all disappear when you lose yourself in a great story.“Electricity is but the fleeting byproduct from nuclear reactors.

The actual product is forever deadly radioactive waste.” —Michael Keegan, Coalition for a Nuclear-Free Great Lakes Highly radioactive wastes include solid irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies (euphemistically called “spent” or “used” by the industry that creates them) and liquid high-level radioactive wastes.End Points for spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russian and the United States provides an analysis of the management of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in Russia and the United States, describing inventories, comparing approaches, and assessing the end-point options for storage and disposal of materials and wastes.